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Who do the working classes vote for?

  • 17/07/2019
  • Author:Liam.Evans@turn2us.org.uk

Does party loyalty still exist?

corbyn and may

Between 1987 and the most recent election in 2017, voting habits for people on low-incomes have changed dramatically.

While people on low incomes have historically been more likely to vote Labour than Conservative, party loyalty is no longer guaranteed.

A new report from JRF states that: “Low-income voters are ‘up for grabs’ like never before”. Between 2010 and 2017, over 50% of low income voters changed who they voted for or if they voted at all.

Timeline

  • 1987: 47% of low income voters supported Labour, while 29% voted Conservative
  • 1992: 54% of low income voters supported Labour, while 26% voted Conservative
  • 1997: 64% of low income voters supported Labour, while 13% voted Conservative
  • 2001: 66% of low income voters supported Labour, while 12% voted Conservative
  • 2005: 47% of low income voters supported Labour, while 22% voted Conservative
  • 2010: 39% of low income voters supported Labour, while 25% voted Conservative
  • 2015: 40% of low income voters supported Labour, while 28% voted Conservative
  • 2017: 53% of low income voters supported Labour, while 33% voted Conservative

Votes for the Liberal Democrats fell from 23% in 1987 to 2% in 2017.

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